Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Cette page regroupe l'ensemble des publications de Futuribles sur cette thématique (Vigie, revue, bibliographie, études, etc.)

Bibliography

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Le scénario Zero Waste. Zéro déchet, zéro gaspillage

Entre 2006 et 2011, la ville italienne de Capannori a réussi à réduire les déchets de ses 43 000 habitants de 57 %. Aujourd’hui, 80 % des déchets ménagers sont recyclés ou compostés, et la ville souhaite aller encore plus loin, pour atteindre l’objectif zero waste. Il s'agit à la fois de supprimer les déchets non valorisés et le gaspillage de ressources sous toutes ses formes. Aujourd'hui, plus de 300 villes en Europe et aux États-Unis ont adopté ...

(437 more words)

Note de veille

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

L’Afrique est-elle promise à un avenir énergétique radieux ?

L’Afrique est objet de commisérations, la crise sanitaire du virus Ebola en ce moment en est malheureusement un exemple, tout en étant considérée comme un continent d’avenir. Un récent rapport de l’Agence internationale de l’énergie (AIE) en présente plutôt une vision optimiste, en particulier sous l’angle de ses perspectives énergétiques. Quelques constats s’imposent : — l’Afrique subsaharienne représente aujourd’hui, 13 % de la population de la planète mais elle ne consomme que 4 % de l ...

(564 more words)

Revue

Économie, emploi - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Quasi-Circular Growth: A Pragmatic Approach to the Sustainable Management of Non-Renewable Material Resources

Still within the context of this special issue that builds upon the study undertaken by Futuribles International in 2013-14 entitled “Producing and Consuming in the Era of Ecological Transition”, François Grosse outlines what he sees as the most practical approach for shifting our societies towards “quasi-circular growth”. Conscious that the option of zero or negative growth is a utopian solution, he proposes a sustainable management of non-renewable material resources aimed at optimizing the consumption cycle of such resources within a growth economy.

After briefly reminding us of the consumerist context we live in, Grosse describes the main characteristics of the stocks and flows of non-renewable raw materials in the economy –their rate of growth, their residence time in the economy, the effect of stocks and flows of waste materials and the potential role played by recycling. He goes on to demonstrate the conditions under which we could implement a quasi-circular growth model, ensuring the sustainable management of non-renewable raw materials. This would involve low levels of growth in the production/consumption of each material, with at least 80% of the quantities of each material consumed entering the waste cycle, and more than 60%, if not indeed 80% of this waste effectively being recycled. This is a systemic vision that would enable us to retain a form of economic growth, while taking account of the limits of our ecosystem and the finite nature of resources.

Revue

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

A Vision of French Consumption in 2030: Towards a Softening of Environmental Impacts

Like most industrialized countries today, France has become aware of the need to undertake an ecological transition, in order to shift its modes of production and consumption towards reduced use of raw materials and less pollution. However, bringing down household consumption is no easy task, even if, as we have seen throughout this special issue, there are incentives that can be deployed. As a helpful complement to the various analyses that have come out of the study “Producing and Consuming in the Era of Ecological Transition”, this article by Éric Vidalenc, Laurent Meunier and Claire Pinet presents the results of a very recent foresight study carried out by ADEME, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency, on consumption in France to 2030, with a view to reducing its environmental impact.

The authors remind us of the continuous progression of consumption in France since 1960 and the serious impact this has had on the environment. They go on to describe in detail the scenario that ADEME’s researchers arrived at with an eye to reducing the environmental footprint of French consumption by 2030. They stress, for example, the levers that could be used to this end (reducing food waste, increasing the lifespan of capital goods, new mobility services etc.), alongside the quantitative outcomes such a proactive scenario could produce. As we can see, there is scope to change existing patterns of consumption, but there is much still to do to activate the key levers and make really systemic changes over the next 15 years.

Revue

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

Producing and Consuming in the Era of Ecological Transition: A Study by Futuribles International

Between April 2013 and April 2014, Futuribles International coordinated a massive study aimed at identifying emergent consumption behaviour in order to gauge the prospects for development, the effects on production processes and the economic, social, environmental and other impacts. This study, which was focused on France, consisted of four phases: a diagnostic phase on material consumption in France; a listing of emergent modes of consumption and production in France and abroad, and a selection of those which seem, on the face of it, to offer the greatest potential for resource-saving; a study of the dissemination potential of these innovative practices; and the development of scenarios with a time-horizon of 2030 on consumption practices and their impact in terms of resource-saving. Cécile Désaunay, who co-directed this study, provides a summary of it here, the aim ultimately being to inform thinking on the links between wealth creation and the use of non-renewable natural resources, and to show that there are levers that can be used to promote the transition to styles of life and consumption that are simpler and more respectful of our ecosystem.

Revue

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

What Trajectory for Energy Transition? The Genealogy of the Energy Transition Law and its Positioning with regard to Pre-existing Scenarios

The many lively debates that preceded –and still fuel– discussion of the “Energy Transition and Green Growth” bill attest to the importance of that law for many French citizens and economic actors. Without going back over the debate on the feasibility or realism of the law’s objectives, to which Futuribles contributed through its website in late September, it is possible to put these matters into some perspective, as Patrick Criqui does here, by reminding us of the genealogy of the bill and the various future scenarios that were developed during the French National Debate on Energy Transition of 2013 before the bill passed into law.

Criqui reminds us of the possible scenarios discussed, grouped as they were around four major energy trajectories: “Energy-saving”, “Efficiency”, “Diversity” and “Decarbonization”. Among these, the most important sources of divergence were over the level of reduction of energy consumption by 2050 and the relative parts to be played by nuclear power and renewable energies. Basing himself on the target figures included in the bill, Patrick Criqui identifies the image of the future towards which, on the face of it, the law points –namely, the “Efficiency” trajectory– even if, as he very rightly emphasizes, its implementation will definitely be a dynamic affair, incorporating the various adaptations that might turn out to be necessary between now and 2050.

Revue

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

Looking Back and Forward at Consumption Trends in France and their Environmental Impacts

Between April 2013 and April 2014, Futuribles International coordinated a massive study aimed at identifying emergent consumption behaviour in order to gauge the prospects for development, the effects on production processes and the economic, social, environmental and other impacts. In the first stage of that study, it was necessary to assess the state of consumption in France, in order to detect the main trends at work. The findings of this first phase, aimed at establishing a historical diagnosis with regard to consumption in France, are presented here by Cécile Désaunay and Nicolas Herpin, with a major underlying question at issue: are we approaching a peak of material consumption?

After a detailed description of the method used (study of the main areas of consumption, use of life-cycle analysis, carbon accounting etc.), Désaunay and Herpin outline what was learned about the evolution of consumption in France over the last 60 years, particularly with respect to the three most important areas (food, housing/energy and transport). In so doing, they come to the conclusion that France has not (yet?) reached a peak of material consumption.

Having established this finding, they then enquire into the factors that are likely to curb the trend towards rising consumption in France: the potential saturation of needs, the battle against waste and built-in obsolescence, and (voluntary or enforced) restrictions on consumption. The ultimate objective is to move towards a reduction in material consumption, in order to begin the transition towards more sustainable development.

Revue

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

Voluntary and Involuntary Simplicity

In this contribution, which builds on the study carried out by Futuribles International in 2013-14 entitled “Producing and Consuming in the Era of Ecological Transition”, Christian Arnsperger and Dominique Bourg show how the principle of simplicity has been a central one within traditional civilizations since Antiquity. Only with the arrival of industrial society did this change, the dynamic of that society being based on the accumulation of goods and the accelerated replacement of products to the detriment of the pursuit of human self-improvement.

And yet, argue Arnsperger and Bourg, the race for “ever more” material goods not only cannot be extended to the whole of humanity or sustained ecologically but it is fundamentally destructive of what constitutes the authenticity and dignity of the human species. By forcing us to produce and consume without misusing limited natural resources and with respect for the fragile equilibria of our ecosystem, ecological transition encourages us to rethink the notion of simplicity, not simply as a constraint imposed by the finite nature of our resources but also as the product of a new socio-anthropological ideal.

In this way, simplicity would not solely be an involuntary thing, imposed by the finite nature of resources and the dangers ensuing from the impact of human activity on the ecosystem, but it would also be the product of an anthropological and political critique of a development model that fails to meet the non-material aspirations of our species. Whether voluntary or not, simplicity seems to have become essential if we are to avoid civilizational collapse.

Revue

Recherche, sciences, techniques - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

The Role of Consumption in Climate Change: Impacts on the Climate and Potential Levers –the UK Example

In this issue on perspectives for consumption between now and 2030, Ruth Wood, Laurent Meunier and William Lamb examine the potential role of consumption as a lever for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, basing themselves on the state of UK research into the question. After reviewing the current context of climate change negotiations and the way emissions are currently accounted, they point up the advantages of starting from the end-consumer in the accounting of national greenhouse gas emissions. They go on to identify the main policy levers for lowering these consumption-related emissions, taking particular notice of the proportion of imports embedded in products consumed in a country like the UK. These include tax adjustment at borders, the active participation of firms, the integration of consumption-related emissions into national carbon budgets etc. Lastly, they stress the increasing usefulness of the British research for achieving awareness of the impacts of consumption on the climate, and also the need to take the longer term view, involving “realistic” time horizons, given the enormous efforts that will be required to meet the emissions target set for limiting global warming to 2°C by 2100.

Editorial

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

D’une ère à l’autre

En 1972, quatre chercheurs du MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) publiaient le premier rapport au Club de Rome sous le titre The Limits to Growth [1], qui montrait en substance que la poursuite de la croissance économique, sur le modèle occidental de développement, exigeait une consommation toujours plus importante de ressources qui, inévitablement, buterait sur des limites. Le premier choc pétrolier conféra à ce rapport, improprement traduit en français sous le titre Halte à la croissance??, un grand succès en ...

(922 more words)

Tribune

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Transition énergétique : quelle trajectoire ?

Patrick Criqui, économiste, directeur de recherche au CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique), laboratoire PACTE (Politiques publiques, action politique, territoires)-EDDEN (Économie du développement durable et de l’énergie), Grenoble ; membre en 2013 du groupe d’experts du Débat national sur la transition énergétique. Pour bien comprendre les éléments structurants du projet de loi relatif à la transition énergétique pour la croissance verte (TECV)qui a été mis en discussion au Parlement français le 1er octobre 2014, il est ...

(1886 more words)

Tribune

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Une avancée dans le bon sens

Bruno Rebelle, directeur général de Transitions et membre du Comité de pilotage du débat national sur la transition énergétique, auteur de Libérons les énergies ! Pour une transition énergétique ambitieuse (Paris : Lignes de repères, juin 2014) Le projet de « loi de programmation de la transition énergétique pour l’économie verte », soumis aux débats du Parlement, retient des objectifs qui, s’ils sont tenus, placeront le modèle énergétique français sur une trajectoire radicalement nouvelle, à même de répondre aux enjeux climatiques et ...

(1616 more words)

Tribune

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Transition énergétique à la française : quo vadis ?

Pierre Papon, professeur émérite de physique à l’École de physique et chimie industrielles de Paris, président du conseil d’administration de la Fondation de la Maison des sciences de l’homme de Paris, membre du comité de rédaction de Futuribles Objectifs et ambitions La loi relative à la « transition énergétique pour la croissance verte » veut initier un « nouveau modèle énergétique français » avec des ambitions importantes : lutter contre le réchauffement climatique, renforcer l’indépendance énergétique de la France et créer ...

(1552 more words)

Tribune

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Des limites systémiques et temporelles complètement sous-estimées

Pierre Bonnaure, ingénieur ESE (Supélec) et en génie atomique ; membre du comité d’orientation de Futuribles   1) Les objectifs présentés dans l’exposé des motifs du projet de loi (essentiellement lutte contre réchauffement, chômage, facture énergétique) sont-ils crédibles, pertinents et suffisants ? Le pilier des économies d’énergie s’impose quelles que soient les circonstances. Encore faut-il que le coût des actions envisagées soit proportionné à la valeur des pertes évitées… Le pilier des énergies renouvelables souffre d’une surestimation excessive ...

(2069 more words)

Tribune

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Des objectifs louables, mais sans moyens efficaces pour les mettre en œuvre

Corinne Lepage, députée européenne, présidente du Rassemblement Citoyen Cap 21, ancienne ministre de l’Environnement (1995-1997), membre du comité d’orientation de Futuribles   Le projet de loi sur la transition énergétique (LTE) est présenté comme un texte de loi majeur pour le quinquennat de François Hollande. En réalité, cette question de la transition énergétique est une question majeure pour la société française dans son ensemble et le sujet va bien au-delà d’un quinquennat présidentiel, quel qu’il soit. Il ...

(2068 more words)

Note de veille

Entreprises, travail - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Économie circulaire : urgence pour l’industrie minière

Il aura fallu des millions d’années pour constituer les réserves minérales de la Terre. Si rien n’est fait, 200 ans auront suffi, au total, pour les épuiser. Depuis plus d’un siècle, l’industrie des mines et des métaux exploite de façon croissante les ressources minérales. L’exploitation des « grands métaux » comme l’aluminium, le cuivre, le titane ou le chrome, comme celle des « métaux rares » comme l’or ou les métaux du groupe du platine, a connu ...

(1184 more words)

Note de veille

Entreprises, travail - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Économie circulaire : le BTP doit faire sa révolution

Responsable de la production des trois quarts des déchets en France, le secteur de la construction doit accélérer sa transition vers l’économie circulaire qui ne se limite pas au seul recyclage des matériaux. En France, les activités de construction, de réhabilitation et de démolition produisent 73 % des déchets, soit 260 millions de tonnes par an (voir figure) [1]. Ces déchets mobilisent d’importantes installations de stockage dont les capacités sont limitées. Par exemple, les déblais qui seront générés par ...

(947 more words)

Note de veille

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Nouvelle alerte sur le risque d’effondrement de l’humanité

En 1972, quatre experts du MIT (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) publiaient leur rapport au Club de Rome, The Limits to Growth (Halte à la croissance en français) [1], dans lequel ils alertaient sur le fait que la poursuite de la croissance économique à l’échelle mondiale se heurterait aux limites physiques des ressources de la planète. 40 ans plus tard, des chercheurs australiens ont actualisé ces travaux et aboutissent à des conclusions similaires, qui vont aussi dans le même sens ...

(712 more words)

Note de veille

Entreprises, travail - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Économie circulaire : les nouveaux “business models”

La forte croissance de la population et sa concentration dans les zones urbaines va entraîner une très forte augmentation de la demande en matières premières. L’accès aux ressources naturelles dont les réserves sont limitées va devenir de plus en plus difficile et concurrentiel. La seule demande en eau devrait excéder les réserves disponibles de 40 % dès 2030 [1]. En prévision d’un accès difficile aux ressources, les industriels lancent des initiatives pour les utiliser de façon plus efficace : ils ...

(1113 more words)

Actualité du futur

Recherche, sciences, techniques - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Which Pathways to limit global warming to 2 ° C ?

The Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) is a network of exchange and knowledge dedicated to the decarbonisation of the economy set up in October 2013. It includes 15 teams of French researchers who are all responsible to imagine indicative roadmap to complete the ecological transition. Under the project, a first interim report has been published by IDDRI (Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations) and Sustainable Development Solutions Network (NSDS), which presents the first analysis of trajectories devised in order ...

(299 more words)

Editorial

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

L’urgence de la transition écologique

Il est habituellement considéré que le meilleur moyen de freiner la croissance démographique est de limiter les naissances plutôt que de restreindre la durée de vie des êtres humains. Dans le domaine économique, il est au contraire généralement considéré qu’un des ressorts principaux de la croissance consiste à accroître le rythme de disparition des biens de sorte qu’ils soient plus rapidement remplacés. Ainsi — à supposer le nombre de consommateurs constant (hypothèse d’école assurément) — il est souvent affirmé ...

(867 more words)

Revue

Entreprises, travail - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Société, modes de vie

Product Obsolescence: the Ecological Impact

Faced with the limitations set by our planet (raw materials, energy etc.), with climate change and with the need to keep down waste emissions of all kinds, our societies are necessarily going to have to effect a major transition —the so-called “ecological transition”. With this in mind, and with a more sustainable model of production and consumption as the goal, the fight against the so-called “built-in” obsolescence of products has a major part to play. And yet, are we able to assess the real ecological impact of the products concerned, from the point of manufacture to the end of their life?

Éric Vidalenc and Laurent Meunier, who have studied this question at the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME), provide some valuable keys to an answer in this article. They begin by reminding us what is meant by “built-in obsolescence” (showing the pertinence and limits of the concept), as well as covering product innovation strategies and the crucial role of the consumer. Drawing on life-cycle analyses, they then examine the ecological impact of the goods most traditionally affected by obsolescence (domestic electrical goods, cars, computers and smartphones) and the underlying causes of the phenomenon. They go on to propose a variety of avenues and strategies whereby that impact can be reduced, depending on whether it is caused by the use of the item or its manufacture. What is, ultimately, important is to make both manufacturers and consumers act responsibly, the former by encouraging a move towards the “circular” or “functional” economy and towards recycling, eco-design etc. and the latter by providing them with better information and ad hoc incentives.

Note de veille

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Singapour, tête de pont des énergies marines en Asie

Le 1er novembre 2013, l’Energy Research Institute(ERI@N) de l’université singapourienne de technologie de Nanyang (NTU) et l’European Marine Energy Center (EMEC), basé sur l’île d’Orkney, dans le nord de l’Écosse, signaient un accord de coopération. Selon le communiqué de presse diffusé par les deux parties [1], « l’EMEC, centre pionnier de test et d’expérimentation pour les dispositifs d’énergies marines, leader mondial du secteur, conseillera l’université sur la configuration des ...

(876 more words)

Note de veille

Recherche, sciences, techniques - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Le Web, premier consommateur d’électricité en France ?

La consommation d’électricité nécessaire au fonctionnement des infrastructures du Web fait l’objet, depuis quelques années, d’études souvent alarmistes. En effet, la diffusion rapide des supports de connexion à Internet, l’essor du big data et du cloud computing ont entraîné une croissance exponentielle de la consommation électrique des serveurs distants et des data centers notamment [1]. En conséquence, selon une étude de l’université de Dresde, en 2030, la consommation d’énergie des infrastructures du Web pourrait ...

(575 more words)

Actualité du futur

Recherche, sciences, techniques - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Quelles actions mettre en œuvre pour limiter le réchauffement climatique à 2 °C ?

Le Deep Decarbonization Pathways Project (DDPP) est un réseau d’échange et de connaissances sur la décarbonisation de l’économie mis en place en octobre 2013. Il regroupe 15 équipes de chercheurs français qui sont toutes chargées d’imaginer une feuille de route indicative pour mener à bien la transition écologique. Dans le cadre du projet, un premier rapport intermédiaire vient d’être publié par l’IDDRI (Institut du développement durable et des relations internationales) et le Sustainable Development Solutions ...

(339 more words)

Chapitre Ressources...

Ce chapitre est extrait du Rapport Vigie 2016 de Futuribles International, qui propose un panorama structuré des connaissances et des incertitudes des experts que l'association a mobilisés pour explorer les évolutions des 15 à 35 prochaines années sur 11 thématiques.