Institutions

Cette page regroupe l'ensemble des publications de Futuribles sur cette thématique (Vigie, revue, bibliographie, études, etc.)

Note de veille

Entreprises, travail - Institutions

Dialogue social : vers un changement des règles du jeu

Trois rapports, en moins de 15 jours, ont traité du dialogue social : le rapport de l’Institut Montaigne (Sauver le dialogue social [1]), celui du think-tank Terra Nova, rédigé par Gilbert Cette et Jacques Barthélémy [2], et celui du groupe de travail coordonné par Jean-Denis Combrexelle [3]. À quoi il conviendrait d’ajouter celui de l’Institut de l’entreprise, publié il y a deux ans sous le titre Dialogue social : l’âge de raison [4]. Ce qu’il y ...

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Futurs d'antan

Institutions - Territoires, réseaux

A Brief History of the French Regions, from Serge Antoine to François Hollande

In 2014 a new stage in decentralization was begun by the French government at the request of the President of the Republic. On 2 July, the National Assembly passed a bill on the “new territorial organization of the Republic”, which had already been approved by the Senate. This is the third strand in current decentralization measures, after the law modernizing territorial public action and strengthening metropolises (January 2014) and the law on the delimitation of regions (January 2015). The territorial reorganization envisaged (particularly the merging of regions) has ruffled a few feathers. However, reading this article republished here in “Futures of Yesteryear”, which reminds us how the current map of the regions was initially devised, it is clear that, though there are some obvious reasons for the current boundaries, there is also –as the architect of those boundaries Serge Antoine thought at the time– scope for development and realignments.

Revue

Institutions - Territoires, réseaux

Towards a Metropolitan World?

Given the difficulties states are having coping with the various current (financial, economic, environmental…) crises at both the national and international levels, attention is increasingly being drawn to the growing scope at the local level for initiatives to attempt to meet the foremost present and future challenges. This is well illustrated by Jean Haëntjens in this issue, when he calls for the implementation of strategic visions in cities to cope with climate problems. Julien Damon reinforces the point in this article, stressing how important the metropolitan level is tending to become globally in the response to both the major and minor problems of individuals. Drawing on various recent publications in the English-speaking world, he shows what underlies this potential “metropolitan revolution” and assesses how prevalent it might also become in France as a result of ongoing local government reorganization. Taking these thoughts further, Julien Damon speculates on the possible emergence in France of “welfare-metropolises” coming gradually to supplant a flagging welfare state.

Forum

Économie, emploi - Institutions

France Stalls: A Focus on Declinism

Give or take a few periods of brief recovery, France has been in crisis now for more than 40 years: the oil crises of the mid-1970s, the industrial crisis and mass unemployment in the 1980s and 1990s and, more recently, the economic and financial crisis of 2007-08, the end of which is not yet in sight. In response to this state of crisis, the state has regularly dipped into the public finances in an attempt to give the economy fresh impetus. It has not been particularly successful, though it has achieved an almost unmanageable level of debt as a result. If we add to this the limits set by the planetary over-exploitation of natural resources and the need to deal with ongoing climate change, there seems no question that a change of socio-economic model is demanded. Is France capable of taking up this challenge? Futuribles open its columns to two expressions of opinion on “France between declinism and transition”.

Pierre Bonnaure goes first in the debate, showing –from an analysis of plentiful sources ranging over more than 40 years– that the problem was diagnosed long ago and that, despite frequent wake-up calls, France is heading further into the mire. Will it be able to embrace the third industrial revolution, the revolution of mass robotization and digital at all levels? The potential for this exists, argues Bonnaure, but institutional rigidities and the vested interests developed by the leading elites over the years etc. represent major obstacles. This is confirmed by the ignorance these elites have always shown with regard to the warnings issued and reforms proposed over the last few decades.

Bibliography

Institutions - Territoires, réseaux

L’Égalité des territoires. Une passion française

Avec L’Égalité des territoires, une passion française, Philippe Estèbe interroge les fondements de l’idéologie territoriale française dans ses aspects historique, géographique et politique, ainsi que les défis contemporains qui obligent à les reconsidérer. Son hypothèse liminaire est audacieuse : considérer l’égalité territoriale comme une déclinaison de l’égalité politique et sociale consubstantielle à la République. Partant, l’égalité territoriale dont on connaît la fortune institutionnelle récente, avec la création d’un ministère et d’un commissariat général, constituerait ...

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Bibliography

Économie, emploi - Institutions

Chine. Le grand bond dans le brouillard

Dédié à Erik Izraelewicz, cet ouvrage se lit comme le troisième épisode des livres de cet ancien directeur du Monde qui, après avoir montré comment « la Chine change le monde [1] », s’inquiétait de l’« arrogance chinoise [2] ». Correspondant du quotidien Les Échos à Pékin, Gabriel Grésillon décrit un pays à la recherche d’un nouveau souffle et dont l’avenir est très incertain. Il débute par « un état des maux » en commençant par une description du désastre environnemental, premier ...

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Tribune européenne

Géopolitique - Institutions

No Way Forward But Federalism?

The fact that many European countries are mired in economic crisis, the social consequences of that crisis and the geopolitical instability now afflicting the eastern and southern frontiers of the EU attest ever more keenly to the limitations of the European institutional model. As an economic giant whose external security is no longer genuinely guaranteed by the United States and an ally reluctant to engage in external theatres of operation, the European Union is perhaps at a crossroads, writes Jean-François Drevet. Beyond this point, only the federalist path can enable it to face current and future challenges. After reviewing Europe’s shortcomings in economic, security and defence matters, Drevet’s column calls for an end to the dilemmas besetting the Union and shows that the most appropriate solution would very definitely be to upscale in terms of political governance and make the –too often rejected– leap to federalism.

Bibliography

Institutions - Société, modes de vie

Penser un autre futur

Le laboratoire TEPSIS (Transformation de l’État, politisation des sociétés, institution du social) organisait le mardi 17 mars 2015, à l’École des hautes études en sciences sociales, une table ronde intitulée « Penser un autre futur », dans le cadred du cycle de débats « Les Agendas du politique ». Face à un avenir lourd de menaces, marqué par les dérèglements climatiques ou l’accroissement des inégalités sociales, se pose la question de l’espoir, et de la manière d’envisager collectivement un ...

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Bibliography

Institutions - Société, modes de vie

Notre Europe

« La majorité des politiques ne sait pas écouter. » Pire, il leur manque les modèles mentaux nécessaires pour comprendre la complexité de la crise que nous vivons et celle de l’Europe. Mauro Ceruti ne mâche pas ses mots. Celui qu’Edgar Morin appelle son esprit frère italien, a participé à la création du Partito Democratico, principal parti de gauche en Italie, et a été cinq ans sénateur, jusqu’en 2013. « Une expérience décevante. » Tout en enseignant la philosophie des sciences ...

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Bibliography

Géopolitique - Institutions

Europa. La dernière chance de l’Europe

L’ancien président de la République française, Valéry Giscard d’Estaing, a le grand mérite de rompre le silence assourdissant des leaders politiques français sur l’avenir devenu incertain du grand mouvement d’unification européenne qui a marqué le dernier siècle. Il tire la leçon de la profonde divergence qui oppose les pays décidés à poursuivre le processus d’intégration économique, monétaire et fiscale, et ceux qui se satisfont de la participation à un grand marché et récusent l’objectif ...

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Bibliography

Institutions

Le bel avenir de l’État-providence

Plus de 30 ans après les analyses de Pierre Rosanvallon dans son ouvrage La Crise de l’État-providence où ce dernier proposait la mise en place d’une « post-social-démocratie » basée sur une triple dynamique de socialisation, de décentralisation et d’autonomisation [1], Éloi Laurent nous livre un plaidoyer stimulant, engagé et à contre-courant, sur ce qu’il appelle « le bel avenir de l’État-providence ». Il propose de le réinventer dans les domaines liés à la question écologique (lire son précédent ...

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Editorial

Géopolitique - Institutions

Aux artisans du futur

Bonne année à nos lectrices et à nos lecteurs. Le moment est venu de tourner la page d’une année 2014 qui aura été marquée par une conjoncture particulièrement morose aux plans international, européen et français. Ceux qui pensaient, comme Francis Fukuyama, que la chute de l’Empire soviétique allait se traduire par « la fin de l’Histoire [1] », la victoire définitive de l’économie de marché et de la démocratie, en auront été pour leurs frais. Comme nous l ...

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Tribune européenne

Institutions - Territoires, réseaux

An End to France’s Territorial Layer-Cake?

Shortly after forming his government, the French Prime Minister Manuel Valls caused something of a stir among French local and regional authorities by announcing, last April, that the number of French regions would be halved in 2017 and by proposing to abolish départements by 2021. Though there is much to be said for this, given France’s territorial complexity, the experience of previous attempts at reform and the way a number of local politicians tend to cling to their powers mean that this new initiative –officially launched in June– is not certain to come to fruition.

However, as Jean-François Drevet shows here, comparing the kinds of territorial division prevailing in France with those in other European countries where municipalities, counties/provinces and regions are concerned, it would be a logical development enabling the country to resemble its European partners more closely in terms of territorial organization. Moreover, such a reform would give scope for some substantial savings –a point not to be ignored in such delicate times for the public finances, even if we should be careful not to overestimate these, as Jean-François Drevet reminds us in the conclusion to his column.

Editorial

Géopolitique - Institutions

L’Europe en péril ?

Les élections municipales qui se sont déroulées les 23 et 29 mars en France ont sévèrement sanctionné le gouvernement, récemment qualifié de social-démocrate, mis en place au lendemain de l’élection du président François Hollande. Le taux d’abstention a atteint un niveau record (63,70 %), ceci témoignant, une fois de plus du discrédit dont souffrent les partis politiques [1]. Cent cinquante-cinq villes de plus de 9 000 habitants, dont une soixantaine de plus de 30 000, ont basculé de ...

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Tribune européenne

Géopolitique - Institutions

The Emergence of a European Neo-Populism

2014 is an important year for the European Union. For the ninth time since 1979 the citizens of its member states will, in May of this year, elect the members to represent them in the European Parliament. Given proportional representation and a socio-economic context prevailing in Europe over the last six years that is, to say the least, tense, there is every risk that the ranks of the parties of the extreme Right will swell. This is to be expected since, as Jean-François Drevet shows here, “neo-populist” movements have grown in strength just about everywhere on the continent in the last few years, whether the countries concerned have been in crisis or not, and they are tending to converge beyond their respective national boundaries, both through their critique of how the EU operates and their defence of “Western identity”. If we add to this the political weakness of governing parties with regard to questions of religion and identity, and the way nationalist extremists and fundamentalist Muslim groups have effectively boosted each other’s fortunes, there is good reason to wonder what the outcome of the coming elections will be, what impact this will have on social cohesion in the various countries of the Union and what the consequences may be for the functioning of European institutions.

Bibliography

Institutions

Réfléchir ensemble à la démocratie de demain

Ce rapport est le premier de la Délégation à la prospective et à l’évaluation des politiques publiques du CESE. Il a pour objectif de présenter des pistes exploratoires quant à la manière d’aborder la démocratie à l’horizon 2030. Il se divise en trois parties : la première dresse le constat d’un désenchantement de la démocratie, la deuxième décrit trois « scénarios du pire » pour la démocratie à l’horizon 2030 et, enfin, la troisième partie offre des pistes ...

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Futurs d'antan

Institutions - Recherche, sciences, techniques - Territoires, réseaux

The Strategic State According to Lamartine: A Discussion of Railways (1842)

Railways, which first came into being in Britain in 1825, contributed greatly to the industrial revolution that characterized Europe in the 19th century. Following its British rival, France began building its first stretches of railway in 1830 and extended these to some 1,800 miles by 1850 (a long way short of the 6,600 miles of the British network at that same date). Nevertheless, the creation of the French rail network would, between 1838 and 1845, spark great public controversy and debates within the government and among parliamentary representatives.

The “Futures of Yesteryear” feature presented here was part of these debates. The piece in question is a speech delivered on 11 May 1842 by the parliamentary deputy (and poet) Alphonse de Lamartine in response to an amendment by Adolphe Thiers, which was aimed at thwarting the government project of building a railway system that radiated out from Paris by constructing a single line to run from the Belgian border to the Mediterranean through the capital. Lamartine opposed this plan vigorously, pointing out in particular the advantage for all France’s regions, and also for trade and industry –not to mention the military– of a network that covered most of the national territory. His address also underlines the importance of the state acting as a strategic agency in the service of those under its jurisdiction. Lastly, at the end of his speech, in response to various diatribes against technical progress (arising, in particular, in the wake of rail accidents), Lamartine stresses the extent to which that progress remains crucial for the forward march of civilization, despite the sporadic cases of harm it may occasion.

Editorial

Institutions

Le courage de réformer

Sans négliger la multitude des problèmes à résoudre cet automne, je reviens une fois de plus sur celui de la réforme des retraites. Deux raisons m’y conduisent : d’abord l’intention du gouvernement français de soumettre cet automne, au Parlement, un nouveau projet de réforme ; ensuite, et peut-être surtout, la manière suivant laquelle le problème est présenté, a fortiori les solutions envisagées, qui me semblent symptomatiques des erreurs fréquemment commises (ou de la dramatique myopie des responsables politiques). Au-delà ...

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Forum

Institutions - Recherche, sciences, techniques

“On Genetically Modified Democracy”: A View of Science in French Ultra-Leftist Circles

Futuribles has on several occasions provided a sounding board for detailed analyses of certain discourses relating to science and technology and the uses that may, in some cases, be made of them. For example, in issue 380 of Dec. 2011, Antonin Pottier presented an analysis of the arguments of climate-change sceptics and the way these were articulated to enable their begetters to defend interests not directly related to the scientific reality of climate change. Similarly, Pierre-Benoit Joly showed how some large corporations went about making use of regulatory norms and discourses linked to sustainable development in order to legitimate a number of controversial lines of research (no. 383).

In the present article Alexandre Moatti looks at the way certain ultra-Leftist movements speak about science and technical progress. He shows, for example, how these small groupings, taking science as their new enemy (alongside, if not instead of, capitalism), are developing an ideology that is very hostile to science –now seen as a cause of the enslavement of consciousness– leading to a re-reading of History which is, to say the least, questionable. This highly negative view of science and progress is not new. There have always been, and no doubt always will be, movements casting doubt on scientific progress, enabling us –quite rightly– to discuss the basic strengths and limitations of that progress. However, the reception in the media –and among a generally well-disposed public– accorded to various kinds of actions carried out by this tendency prompts us to look more closely at the discourse it is promoting and, necessarily, to maintain a degree of vigilance.

Note de veille

Institutions

La France en 2025 : l’initiative du gouvernement français

À la demande du président de la République, s’est tenu le 19 août un séminaire gouvernemental sur « la France en 2025 » qui, selon les termes du Premier ministre, doit marquer le début d’un processus servant à « fixer un cap » pour orienter la politique du gouvernement. Faut-il d’emblée y voir une pure opération de communication à caractère dilatoire ou, au contraire, se féliciter que le gouvernement s’exerce à une telle démarche prospective ? Soyons constructif et essayons de ...

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Note de veille

Institutions

La France va se doter d’un laboratoire d’innovation publique

Le 10 avril dernier, le Secrétariat général pour la modernisation de l’action publique  (SGMAP) a réuni 80 spécialistes de l’innovation pour réfléchir au futur Laboratoire d’innovation publique de l’État. Le futur laboratoire, qui verra a priori le jour avant fin 2013, aura pour vocation d’évaluer les politiques publiques et à faire des propositions de réforme avec pour seul et unique but de simplifier la vie des usagers. À sa création, l’équipe de ce nouveau ...

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Revue

Institutions - Société, modes de vie

Europeans’ Political Values: Right-wing versus Left-wing Values

This article, which draws on the Values studies regularly conducted in Europe, aims to compare Europeans’ political values through their positioning on a Left-Right scale, and their development between 1990 and 2008, and also to analyse the underlying values that go furthest to explaining this positioning. Raul Magni Berton begins by presenting the Left/Right split in the various countries surveyed, as it emerges from the self-positioning of individuals (or their refusal to position themselves), highlighting, among other things, the relative stability of this split in the various countries, the importance it retains in Western Europe and a mild “leftward” trend in Europe.

The author then analyses 11 value conflicts that are likely to explain the political positioning of individuals: attitude to equality, moral progressivism/conservatism, state/market, attitude to law-and-order, nationalism/universalism, solidarity/individualism, attitude to work, degree of materialism, authoritarianism/criticism, attitude to religion, and sexism/sexual equality. Drawing on the observed correlations between these values and the political positioning of individuals, Raul Magni Berton shows, among other things, that religious values are less and less predictive of political standpoints in Western Europe, whereas those relating to egalitarianism, the state and law-and-order play an increasing role. On the other hand, very few significant correlations can be seen in Eastern Europe, which shows the major importance of the –both political and historical– context, and somewhat undermines the idea that the notions of Left and Right are universal in character. This is also confirmed by the country-by-country analysis of differences proposed at the end of the article.

Revue

Économie, emploi - Institutions

Institutions and the Progress of Nations: On Daron Acemoglu and James Robinson’s “Why Nations Fail”

The question of the origins of the wealth of nations has nagged at the mind of many an economist since the first modern contribution to the theme by Adam Smith in 1776. From Angus Maddison to Amartya Sen, by way of Joseph Stiglitz, Jared Diamond or Tony Atkinson, many have tried to offer some sort of answer or to propose arguments capable of explaining inequalities in socio-economic development between countries. In a work published in 2008 (An Introduction to Modern Economic Growth, Princeton: Princeton University Press), the economist Daron Acemoglu identified four fundamental causes of economic growth: natural environment, culture, institutions and luck. He has gone further into this question, with the assistance of James Robinson, in Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty (New York: Crown Publishing Group), published in late 2012.

This work has given fresh stimulus to the debate on the origins of international economic inequalities (particularly on account of one of its conclusions –that Chinese economic growth can be expected to falter without major institutional reform in that country) and Charles du Granrut outlines it for us here. He focuses specifically on the factor the authors regard as essential for guaranteeing sustained economic development –“inclusive” political institutions– and cites various examples in support of their argument. Without neglecting the originality of their approach, he compares it to that taken in an earlier, similarly conceived work (Violence and Social Orders by D.C. North, J.J. Wallis and B.R. Weingast) and highlights some limitations of their analysis.

Revue

Institutions - Société, modes de vie

States and Churches in Europe: Towards a Common Model of Secularism?

In this March-April 2013 issue, which Futuribles is devoting very largely to the social and political impact of religions, Philippe Portier looks at the development of relations between Churches and states in Western Europe. He begins by noting the importance of the religious heritage and outlines the two dominant models: the “confessional state” model, in which one religion is officially singled out (this applies mainly in the Protestant and Orthodox countries) and the model of Church/state separation, in either its flexible (in Central Europe) or rigid form (mainly in France).

However, Portier goes on to highlight an increasingly marked long-term trend for a “combining of trajectories”: in other words, a simultaneous movement of “deconfessionalization” in the countries of Catholic tradition (Italy, Spain) –and also in the Lutheran (Norway) and Orthodox (Greece) nations– and of a re-entry of religion into the public sphere (particularly in France). As Portier sees it, these developments might well represent the emergence of a common model of secularism which, without totally erasing national differences in the regulation of faiths, could be said to be shifting all these countries toward a relatively unified system of “co-operative separation”.

Chapitre Institutions

Ce chapitre est extrait du Rapport Vigie 2016 de Futuribles International, qui propose un panorama structuré des connaissances et des incertitudes des experts que l'association a mobilisés pour explorer les évolutions des 15 à 35 prochaines années sur 11 thématiques.