Institutions

Cette page regroupe l'ensemble des publications de Futuribles sur cette thématique (Vigie, revue, bibliographie, études, etc.)

Revue

Institutions

Reforming the Federal Administration in the United States. On the Volcker Report and its Critics

For several years now, the question of state reform has frequently been under discussion in France, where no government of any political party has been able to make real progress in this regard, as the mounting public deficit shows. Yet the topic is also in the news in countries that some commentators hold up as models, such as the United States.
As Thierry Vircoulon argues here, from a reading of two books on ways of reforming the US Federal administration recently published on the other side of the Atlantic (Urgent Business for America: Revitalizing the Federal Government for the 21st Century. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution, 2003, and High-Performance Government. Structure, Leadership, Incentives. Santa Monica: Rand Corporation, 2005), the problem of how to reorganize what the Federal administration does, and how the many public agencies deliver their services, has been under examination for some years now in the US. The debate about methods of public management, finding ways of improving performance using criteria normally applied in the private sector, benchmarking, etc., is sometimes very similar to the discussion of these subjects in France. It has been given a further boost since 9/11 since the concern with security implies certain changes and a renewed reliance on the state.

Forum

Institutions

France under Chloroform

An exasperated cry from Michel Drancourt, bemoaning the fact that France too often blames the European Union for the country's inability to make the changes that are now necessary - especially reform of the public administration.

Revue

Institutions

When "Civil Society" Enters Politics - Books by Francis Mer and Luc Ferry, two Former French Ministers

Against the background of economic problems in France that have now persisted for several decades and that no government of any political complexion has managed to solve satisfactorily - as was shown at the end of February 2005 when the unemployment rate once again rose above the worrying threshold of 10% of the economically active population - the appointment to the French government in June 2002 of two ministers who were not professional politicians raised the hopes of some commentators.
With the arrival of Francis Mer - previously chief executive of the firm Usinor - and Luc Ferry - a philosopher and writer - "civil society" entered the world of political decision-makers. Would this be a more effective way of undertaking reforms and explaining them to voters? Unfortunately, less than two years later, both men were let go in circumstances that left them puzzled and led them, some months later, to examine their experiences as non-elected appointees surrounded by professional politicians who were constantly worried about their media image since the prospect of elections was never far away.
Michel Drancourt has read both books - Vous, les politiques... (You, the Politicians), Paris: Albin Michel, 2005; Comment peut-on être ministre? Essai sur la gouvernabilité des démocraties (How to be a Minister? Essay on the Governability of Democracies), Paris: Plon, 2005 - for Futuribles. Here he presents the main ideas and expresses some concerns about the efficiency of the French style of government.

Revue

Géopolitique - Institutions

The European Constitution. Its Source, Virtues and Weaknesses

Less than two months before the referendum vote on the European Constitution in France, the political debate has begun, muddling principles, presentation and plenty of other issues that have little relevance to the question being asked. The French voter has good reason to be concerned about many topics, such as a stagnant economy, rising unemployment (in France as in Germany), relocation of manufacturing abroad. It has not helped matters that every time there has been a change of government, the main political parties (in particular the Centre-Right Union pour la majorité présidentielle and the socialist party) have not hesitated to blame "Europe" or globalization for all the problems that they have not been able to deal with themselves.
Now that the European Union has been enlarged to 25 members for almost a year and after a decade of institutional problems, the ratification of the Constitution agreed by the member states is a big step. The main French political parties are well aware of this and are urging a "yes" vote, but this "yes" is blighted by internal quarrels and disagreements that help to confuse the issues.
Robert Toulemon is President of the Association française d'études pour l'Union européenne and an acknowledged expert on the subject. Here he tries to bring the debate back to the basic issue: the Constitution itself, and not the political and socio-economic context in which it is being presented to French voters. He offers a detailed and balanced analysis of the text: its source, the areas where it makes (or might make) advances, but also the lacunae and weaknesses that exist and that a more federalist approach might well have avoided. His position, which is amazingly balanced, coming from a committed European, should not deceive us: how France votes in the referendum will have a decisive impact on the future of the European Union and the role that it will play in global affairs. There is no doubt that a setback now would be fatal.

CR table ronde

Institutions - Recherche, sciences, techniques - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Protocole de Kyoto : l’enjeu de la réduction des émissions de gaz à effet de serre

En guise d’introduction, Hugues de Jouvenel a rappelé que nous étions à la veille de l’entrée en vigueur du protocole de Kyoto (il est entré en application le mercredi 16 février 2005 dans les 127 pays du monde l’ayant ratifié). L’expertise de Pierre Radanne, a-t-il souligné, s’avère donc tout à fait bienvenue pour nous en éclairer les enjeux.

Forum

Institutions - Société, modes de vie

Debate about the Risks of France Declining: the Camdessus Report

In May 2004, having made the revival of the economy and of employment its top priority, the French government (via the minister responsible for the economy at the time, Nicolas Sarkozy) asked Michel Camdessus (former head of the IMF and honorary governor of the Bank of France) to produce a report on the economic and financial outlook for France along with proposals for corresponding strategic policy options. Among other things, the report was also supposed to "shed some preliminary light on the structural obstacles hindering the dynamism" of the French economy.
The report, produced under the guidance of Michel Camdessus and drawing on contributions from about 20 experts with a wide variety of backgrounds, was handed over on 19 October 2004. Under the title Le Sursaut ("The Sudden Start"), it adopted a highly alarmist tone as to the prospects for the French economy: with the risk of failing to keep up, the lack of jobs, the growing debt, etc., it argued that the country is in a downward spiral and that swift action is needed in order to prevent it reaching rock bottom. The report then proposed a range of priority policy directions, in particular aimed at making the labour market more flexible, developing services, fostering education and research, etc.
The very pessimistic tone of the report and its perceived bias towards market forces generated controversy in France, with some commentators fearing that it might become the "Bible" of the current government. Futuribles here provides a platform for two economists with opposing views of the Camdessus Report: Michel Drancourt sees it as a "lucid" assessment of the state of France, whereas Gilles Cazes thinks that the prescription proposed is best forgotten.

Revue

Institutions - Population - Société, modes de vie

No More Smacking?

Futures studies should not be content merely with conducting high-level "macro" analyses but should also be concerned with revealing trends that affect people as individuals. It is therefore extremely important to be able to develop foresight techniques related to everyday life, so as to highlight via particular facts or ideas the changes taking place in the way we live and what they reveal. This article by Julien Damon is a perfect example of such an effort to apply foresight to daily life. It looks at an apparently banal topic - smacking - and shows how modern attitudes to smacking reflect a real shift in approaches to bringing up children and in respect for their rights and freedoms.
The author begins with a brief survey of laws against corporal punishment of children in different countries. He outlines the debates on this issue that stirred up public opinion in Canada and the United Kingdom, and then discusses the French situation.
He goes on to present the arguments used by those in favour of anti-smacking legislation, especially in the United States and France. He notes the growth of a major lobby in France to alert parliamentarians to the problem of corporal punishment within the family.
Finally, Damon argues that this mobilization of opinion reflects major changes in society and in the family: although corporal punishment has clearly been on the decline for several decades, there is now a move to prohibit it by law. Beyond the debate about authority versus liberty, it is also a matter of whether people want a society based on trust or on legal norms.

Bibliography

Institutions - Territoires, réseaux

Horizon 2020 : conflits d’usage dans les territoires, quel nouveau rôle pour l’État ?

L'amélioration de l'accessibilité de l'ensemble des campagnes désormais plus convoitées et le redressement démographique d'une majorité de territoires ruraux entraînent une compétition croissante entre les usages. Dans les territoires ruraux, des antagonismes se développent entre les activités de production agricoles et industrielles qui se maintiennent, la fonction résidentielle en expansion, les loisirs en essor et l'affirmation de la fonction de préservation (la superficie consacrée à la protection des milieux ayant augmenté de 46 % entre 1992 ...

(897 more words)

Bibliography

Institutions

Les Pensions dans les pays de l’OCDE : panorama des politiques publiques

Que coûteront véritablement les promesses de pensions que font aujourd'hui les pays de l'OCDE à leurs travailleurs lorsque ceux-ci prendront leur retraite, et les gouvernements auront-ils les moyens d'honorer ces promesses ? Ce rapport adopte une approche nouvelle en prenant en compte l'espérance de vie, l'âge de départ à la retraite et les droits prévisibles à prestations, permettant ainsi, pour la première fois, aux gouvernements des pays de l'OCDE de comparer directement les effets des ...

(515 more words)

Chapitre Institutions

Ce chapitre est extrait du Rapport Vigie 2016 de Futuribles International, qui propose un panorama structuré des connaissances et des incertitudes des experts que l'association a mobilisés pour explorer les évolutions des 15 à 35 prochaines années sur 11 thématiques.