Villes

Note de veille

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Les acteurs du numérique, nouveaux opérateurs de transport ?

Le secteur de la mobilité a été bouleversé en quelques années seulement par les applications et plates-formes collaboratives, qui permettent à la fois de personnaliser et d’optimiser toujours plus les trajets. Les applications comme Waze (2006) ou Citymapper (2011) permettent ainsi de calculer l’itinéraire le plus pertinent en fonction des contraintes de chacun mais aussi de l’état du trafic. Pour cela, elles analysent en direct l’ensemble des données relatives à la circulation, Waze s’appuyant même ...

(902 more words)

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Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Paris Ars Universalis. Scénario-fiction d’un futur Grand Paris

Paris Ars Universalis. Scénario-fiction d’un futur Grand Paris

Le Grand Paris n’est ici que le support d’un exercice que l’éditeur qualifie de « fiction prospective » et que l’auteur décrit comme « une expérimentation de recherche prospective hors cadre ». Son livre est ce qu’elle appelle un solution book : « Ils [sont] là pour ouvrir l’horizon, quel qu’en soit le scénario. Il [est] important que la pensée soit libre […] Par contre il [est] vivement conseillé de toujours installer les hypothèses dans leurs réalités écosystémiques… » Le scénario ...

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Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Hyper-lieux. Les nouvelles géographies de la mondialisation

Hyper-lieux. Les nouvelles géographies de la mondialisation

Avec Hyper-lieux, Michel Lussault poursuit la réflexion engagée dans ces deux précédents maîtres ouvrages, L’Homme spatial [1] et L’Avènement du monde [2]. L’entreprise repositionne la géographie au cœur des sciences sociales, contribuant ainsi à leur avancée respective. Mais au-delà, en explorant les spatialités contemporaines, en appréhendant l’émergence du monde urbain et de l’anthropocène, en analysant finement ses figures géotypiques et leurs opérateurs — dont les hyper-lieux sont emblématiques —, elle débouche sur une proposition autrement conséquente : un ...

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Revue

Institutions - Territoires, réseaux

Political Visions and Civilizational Challenges: The Example of Local Policies

The theme of lack of vision has become a recurrent one in commentaries on French political life. This is why, a few weeks from the presidential elections (which one might wish to see as an opportunity to offer real medium/long-term future visions to French citizens), Futuribles has decided to delve into this question with a series of articles on the lack of political vision, the reasons behind it, and possible remedies. Jean Haëntjens gives us his analysis, drawing on the lessons to be learned from local policy.

After stressing the many civilizational challenges facing societies, particularly European and Western societies, challenges their leaders need to rise to, he shows how, at the local level, city and district authorities have held out against the dominant paradigm of development at all costs and have proposed new civilizational models. Acting concretely in unison with actors from all walks of life to co-produce policies, these authorities have developed initiatives in the cultural and ecological fields and in the area of mobility etc. that offer their residents new visions of the future, based on different values. These new political models, which one finds in many European countries, represent an initial base level the European Union might build on, drawing inspiration from them in its search for a civilizational model attuned to the imperative tasks currently facing us (global warming, transition, human rights and freedoms etc.), if indeed the political leaders of its member states are capable of getting a collective handle on these tasks…

Revue

Économie, emploi - Société, modes de vie

Societies and Ways of Life across the World: Major Trends to 2030-2050

Though the existence of disparities between the societies of the world’s different countries and between their specific contexts makes it impossible to determine precisely and exhaustively what social developments will occur worldwide over the coming decades, a certain number of deep-seated, structuring trends can be identified. As Julien Damon shows here, drawing on his contribution to the 2016 Vigie Report, four major trends are worthy of attention: a decrease in poverty worldwide; a continuing advance of the middle classes in the emerging countries and the consequences that ensue in terms of consumption; ongoing urbanization; and increased religious influence. Admittedly, these trends impact poor and rich countries very differently. They are, nonetheless, crucial in the development of the world and of the societies that will shape it in the future.

Bibliography

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Territoires, réseaux

Urban Adaptation to Climate Change in Europe 2016 : Transforming Cities in a Changing Climate

Urban Adaptation to Climate Change in Europe 2016: Transforming Cities in a Changing Climate

Ce rapport de l’Agence européenne de l’environnement fait le point sur les actions menées par les urbanistes et les décideurs politiques pour limiter les impacts du changement climatique dans les villes européennes. Il recommande une approche systémique partant des racines de la vulnérabilité face au changement climatique, ce qui passe par une planification urbaine prévoyant plus d’espaces verts ou interdisant la construction dans des zones inondables. Une annexe présente la liste de la cinquantaine de cas analysés ...

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Futuribles

Les utopies urbaines

Cette table ronde est organisée à l'occasion de la sortie d'un numéro spécial de la revue Futuribles consacré aux Utopies urbaines. Après une courte introduction de Jean Haëntjens et de différents auteurs de ce numéro, un débat sera ouvert avec tous les participants. La séance se terminera par un verre amical. Les membres de Futuribles International ayant acquitté leur cotisation ainsi que les abonnés de la revue Futuribles sont invités aux tables rondes. Des frais de 20 euros ...

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Note de veille

Urban Utopias and Construction. The Eiffage Group’s Phosphore Programme

The ‘Phosphore’ project, rolled out by the construction conglomerate Eiffage, provides a good example of the principle of broadening the range of actors involved in urban innovation. Without claiming to offer a blueprint for society, Phosphore nonetheless goes far beyond the ordinary industrial or urban project. It verges on a utopian approach both in its incorporation of the main themes of contemporary utopias—the limit on resources, personal fulfilment, sharing and mobility—and its methods of horizontal management. Valérie David ...

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Revue

Territoires, réseaux

The Resurgence of Urban Utopias

This year marks the 500th anniversary of the publication of Thomas More’s Utopia, which gave that term its current meaning and reconnected with a literary genre begun by Plato –the detailed description of a society that is seen by the author as ideal. This utopia of More’s, which was highly regarded, particularly in Europe from the 17th century onwards, became very influential and in subsequent centuries many authors have tried their hands at utopian proposals, applied in most cases to circumscribed territories. As Jean Haëntjens reminds us, this strain of utopian thought contributed greatly to fuelling the visions of towns and cities deemed desirable by the political actors and urbanists of the 19th and 20th centuries.

After a long period of “utopian silence”, which led to an absence of innovative thinking on urban matters in the second half of the 20th century, we have for some years now been seeing a host of urban innovations that are akin, in many respects, to utopian ventures. This is why Futuribles has decided to take stock, in this issue, of the complex relations between utopian thinking and urban policies.

Jean Haëntjens opens this dossier by reminding us, first, of the historic collusion between utopians and urbanists, the different periods of utopian thought, and the way urbanists and architects have seized on these utopias to modify the urban landscape. He also shows the developments that have been underway since the 1970s, particularly the emergence of new urban proposals of a utopian or similar nature emanating not from visionary theorists but, increasingly, from associations, communities, enterprises or citizens resolving to take the future of their town or city in hand. It is these initiatives, these new urban utopias that are presented in this issue, with the following question running through the whole enterprise: will they enable us to meet the formidable challenges posed by the accommodation of three billion new urban dwellers by the year 2050?

Revue

Entreprises, travail - Territoires, réseaux

Urban Utopias and the Construction Industry: The Eiffage Group’s “Phosphore” Project

The “Phosphore” project, rolled out by the construction conglomerate Eiffage, provides a good example of the principle of broadening the range of actors involved in urban innovation. Without claiming to offer a blueprint for society, Phosphore nonetheless goes far beyond the ordinary industrial or urban project. It verges on a utopian approach both in its incorporation of the main themes of contemporary utopias –the limit on resources, personal fulfilment, sharing and mobility– and its methods of horizontal management. Valérie David has been running this experimental project since 2007. Here she affords unprecedented insight into the workings of utopian thought in a major construction company.

Revue

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Smart Cities, Between Utopia and Experimentation

While elsewhere in this dossier Carlos Moreno shows how the “smart city” represents a new paradigm for utopian thought, Jean-François Soupizet goes into detail here on what smart cities actually are today. After a historical reminder of the origin of this fashionable concept, he analyses the many –technological, organizational, political etc.– issues inherent in the data worked on by cities and in the so-called “smart” management of that data. He then outlines various ongoing experiments relating to smart cities, before examining a series of questions that are crucial to the thinking about them: are smart cities useful, do they optimize partnerships, do they improve local governance? The future of this new urban model will surely depend on answers to these questions and on the capacity of smart cities to open up to all their stakeholders.

Revue

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

The Darwin Urban Ecosystem: From “Territorial Hacking” to a New Model of Co-producing the City?

Jean-Marc Gancille and Philippe Barre give an account here of the urban eco-system they have played a part in developing in Bordeaux on the wasteland left by an abandoned military barracks. After rehearsing the history of their “takeover” of the site, they show how their project fits into a long-term perspective, combining local traders, co-working, culture, leisure activities, an urban farm and other ecological experiments against a background of alternative citizen culture. It is all about another way of seeing and conceiving urban space, and particularly of putting ecological transition into practice, a notion that has been much talked about in France but has struggled to find wide-scale implementation. And, despite the obstructions and resistance that continue, on a regular basis, to hamper this process of urban creation, the site is expanding, activities and employment are growing, and the ecosystem is developing after the fashion of the Darwinian evolution of species: it is adapting and progressing.

Revue

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Utopia, Artists and the City

Whereas the earliest utopias and those of the 19th century grant only limited scope to art and culture, we have since the late 1960s seen the emergence or re-emergence of genuine artistic utopias that have, in the their way, contributed to the evolution of the city. This is shown in this article by Stéphanie Lemoine, which forms part of this special issue on urban utopias. Whether in the form of ephemeral events or the mobilization of “flash mobs” against a counter-cultural or revolutionary political backdrop, urban-artistic utopias are more and more common and increasingly represent alternative propositions capable of fuelling the cultural dimension of urban policies.

Revue

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Urban Smartness or Algorithmic Cities? What Scope for New Utopias?

For some years, “smart cities” have aroused a great deal of interest, particularly in a context of renewed concern with towns and cities, which provide the optimal experimental scale when it comes to ecological transition and resilience to climate change. Though there is no unanimously accepted definition, “smart cities” nonetheless have widely recognized characteristics: reconciling economic development, a reduced environmental footprint and improvement of the quality of life of city-dwellers by drawing on available –and, particularly, digital– technologies. Given these objectives, plans for smart cities belonged for a long time to the category of urban utopias. However, with rapid technological advance and a growing awareness of the need for ecological transition, utopia has gradually been caught up by reality.

In this article, Carlos Moreno shows us how urban “smartness” represents a new paradigm for utopian thinking and may offer a real opportunity for our urban areas and their citizens to evolve. He also stresses the importance of not confining ourselves to a focus on the technological dimension and contributing to the emergence of human smart cities.

Revue

Économie, emploi - Territoires, réseaux

How a Territory Becomes Creative: A Lesson from Venice

At the margins of this issue devoted to urban utopias, Arlette and André-Yves Portnoff show in this article how a territory can gear itself up for creativity and so place itself at the heart of the socio-economic system of which it is part. They take as examples the city of Venice in its 15th- and 16th-century glory days, and the actions of an inspired individual, Aldo Manuzio, who seized on the printing technique invented by Gutenberg to publish illustrated books and works of humanist thinking. Arlette and André-Yves Portnoff show how, thanks to this innovation in the dissemination of the written word, Venice, a territory open to the world and to classical learning, underwent an exceptional level of development for Europe at that time. They also remind us how this rise of Venice was stopped in its tracks by censorship and the Inquisition, proof if any were needed of the importance of vision and values in the development of territories and their openness to the world. This is a lesson worth remembering at a time when Europe is facing a resurgence of inward-looking tendencies and obscurantist values.

Revue

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

The Prototype City: Or How the Countries of the South are Reinventing Urbanism

As the Habitat III international conference to be held at Quito in October 2016 is in preparation (following the conferences of Vancouver in 1976 and Istanbul in 1996, it will lay down the United Nations road map for urban development over the next twenty years), one thing is clear: solutions for the city of tomorrow are no longer to be sought solely from among the developed countries, but increasingly from the cities of the South. Those cities, with populations that are increasing rapidly and should continue to do so in the coming decades, are offering a new approach to urbanism: namely prototype urbanism, an approach that is less theoretical and more experimental. Morgan Poulizac outlines its mechanisms for us here (responding –often urgently– to the social demand with the means that happen to be to hand) and provides various examples from the African, Asian and South American continents.

Editorial

Territoires, réseaux

Les utopies urbaines

Le précédent numéro de notre revue était très largement consacré aux relations entre science-fiction et prospective, aux apports de celle-ci à celle-là. Nous avons bien vu alors, notamment au travers de l’article de Gérard Klein [1], que les réflexions sur l’avenir relèvent de genres littéraires différents (utopie, dystopie, uchronie, science-fiction, prospective…) mais qui ne se distinguent pas si aisément… En témoigne le dossier spécial orchestré par Jean Haëntjens sur les utopies urbaines que nous publions dans le présent ...

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Revue

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Territoires, réseaux

Urban Nature, a Paradoxical Utopia

Whereas in most countries the issues around sustainable development are well acknowledged at all institutional levels, the question of the place of nature in towns and cities still remains a crucial element to be confronted by those who conceive and craft our urban policies. And yet, as Jean-Pierre Lévy and Isabelle Hajek stress in this article, combining the two terms “nature” and “urban” may seem paradoxical, to say the least –and quite often is so. Is the idea of nature in the city purely utopian then, in the sense that the city might be said by definition to be “anti-nature”? Precisely because of the currently prevalent context of the pursuit of sustainable development, are there not future prospects for urban nature? This is the question Lévy and Hajek analyse here, after first examining the way city-nature relations have been viewed historically; they emphasize the expectations associated with sustainable development and the renewed interest in working out how to reintroduce nature into the urban environment and overcome the paradoxes. Though often idealized and as yet still poorly defined, urban nature remains a dynamic concept which, in its way, also feeds into visions of urban reconfiguration.

Revue

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Utop, an Ongoing Utopian Housing Project in Paris

As Jean Haëntjens stressed in his article at the beginning of this special issue, we have, since the 1970s, seen the emergence of new urban projects, coming not from visionary theorists but increasingly from associations, collectives, companies or citizens who have decided to take the future of their city in hand. Marthe de La Taille-Rivero outlines one of these initiatives here, the work of a collective of Paris citizens who are carrying out a project in participatory living. She shows how a utopian vision of housing shared between friends is about to become reality, since, after surmounting a series of administrative, financial and technical hurdles, the Utop project has been approved by the Paris city authorities and translated into an architectural project that is both environmentally friendly and mindful of the need to connect with the residents of the area. If everything goes according to plan, the housing complex should be in place in two years’ time, lending substance to a new form of urban utopia.

Note de veille

Société, modes de vie - Territoires, réseaux

Une France de plus en plus rurale ?

Les enquêtes dans ce domaine se succèdent, pour mieux se renforcer : une majorité de Français affirment qu’ils aimeraient vivre à la campagne [1]. Cette aspiration, qui tend à croître avec l’âge, apparaît comme une réponse aux inconvénients ressentis de la vie en ville : pollution, insécurité, bruit, coût de la vie, etc. Pourtant, selon les données de l’INSEE (Institut national de la statistique et des études économiques), 77,5 % des Français sont aujourd’hui urbains. Mais ce taux ...

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Bibliography

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Energy Technology Perspectives 2016 : Towards Sustainable Urban Energy Systems

Energy Technology Perspectives 2016: Towards Sustainable Urban Energy Systems

Based on a review by Pierre Papon Given the demographic and economic significance of towns and cities, can we expect to see them operate sustainable, ‘decarbonized’ energy systems? That is the question this IEA (International Energy Agency) report attempts to answer. A few figures will suffice to convey that the role of towns and cities is going to be crucial: two thirds of the world’s population should be urbanized by 2050 (the figure today is one half) and that ...

(399 more words)

Bibliography

Recherche, sciences, techniques - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Energy Technology Perspectives 2016 : Towards Sustainable Urban Energy Systems

Energy Technology Perspectives 2016: Towards Sustainable Urban Energy Systems

L’accord sur le climat adopté à Paris en décembre 2015, à l’issue de la 21e conférence des parties à la convention-cadre des Nations unies sur le changement climatique (COP21), fixe un objectif ambitieux à la planète : une augmentation de la température de l’atmosphère terrestre inférieure à 2 °C (et proche si possible de 1,5 °C). Peut-on envisager des systèmes énergétiques soutenables, « décarbonés », dans les villes, compte tenu de leur poids démographique et économique ? C’est à ...

(815 more words)

Bibliography

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement - Territoires, réseaux

Mobilité urbaine. À l’heure du développement durable

Mobilité urbaine. À l’heure du développement durable

Cet ouvrage, édité par la Fondation Prospective et innovation, revient sur les projets présentés dans le cadre du Prix de la mobilité urbaine intelligente, organisé à Hong Kong du 24 au 26 novembre 2015. Quelques mois seulement après le sommet de la 21e conférence des parties à la convention-cadre des Nations unies sur le changement climatique (COP21), Jean-Pierre Raffarin nous livre, en guise d’introduction, son analyse sur la question environnementale et met en lumière une contradiction, à savoir la ...

(780 more words)

Analyse prospective

Économie, emploi - Territoires, réseaux

Le commerce de demain : avec ou sans les villes, avec ou sans boutiques ?

Quel sera le paysage commercial des villes françaises demain ? La réponse dépend en partie de la fabrique du paysage commercial actuel. Ce paysage résulte d’une combinaison de facteurs de nature économique, géographique, sociologique, historique…, parmi lesquels la concentration des entreprises du commerce moderne a joué un rôle de premier plan. Mais le modèle de développement du commerce moderne, intensif en capital, extensif en espace, est désormais en crise. Le commerce de demain reste à inventer, avec ou sans magasin ...

(13 more words)

Bibliography

Territoires, réseaux

Eco-urbanism : Planetary Challenges, Urban Solutions

Eco-urbanism: Planetary Challenges, Urban Solutions

Based on a review by Frédéric Weill Setting out from the recognition that towns and cities are increasingly on the front line of our planet’s environmental, economic and social challenges, Jean Haëntjens (a consultant on urban strategies) and Stéphanie Lemoine (involved in a sustainable living project) take a look here at a recent paradigm shift. They observe that urbanism, ‘a technical discipline relating to the organization of space’ is gradually giving way to ‘eco-urbanism’, which they define as a ...

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