Inde

Note de veille

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

L’Inde, un géant agricole très discret

L'Inde est devenue le "bureau du monde", mais elle conserve conjointement les traits, aujourd'hui éclipsés, d'un géant agricole confronté à la nécessité de nourrir une population de plus d'un milliard d'habitants.

Bibliography

Géopolitique - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Charting Our Water Future : Economic Framework to Inform Decision-Making

Le 2030 Water Resources Group est une organisation internationale regroupant des entreprises et divers organismes préoccupés par les questions de disponibilité et de gestion des ressources en eau. En publiant le présent rapport, ce groupe souhaite attirer l’attention sur les pénuries en eau qui pourraient apparaître, à l’horizon 2030, dans le monde, et en particulier dans quatre pays : l’Inde, la Chine, le Brésil et l’Afrique du Sud. Selon la plupart des projections actuelles, à l’horizon ...

(395 more words)

CR table ronde

Économie, emploi - Géopolitique - Population

L’Inde à l’horizon 2025 : ses perspectives économiques

Jean-Joseph Boillot a tout d’abord justifié le choix d’une étude de l’Inde à l’horizon 2025, qui lui paraît être une base de travail raisonnable compte tenu du cycle d’un investissement commercial (compris entre 5 et 15 ans) et, plus subjectivement, parce que cette date ne semble pas trop éloignée.

Revue

Entreprises, travail

Indian Large Enterprises in the Years to 2025

Still in the wake of the "India 2025" conference, organized on 12 October 2007 in Paris by the Institut des hautes études de défense nationale and the Asia 21 group (Futuribles International), Philippe Humbert's article, co-written with Jean-Joseph Boillot, draws on his contribution to that conference with regard to the possible future of Indian large enterprises. After presenting the three ages of Indian capitalism, from Independence to the present day, the authors examine the possible development of historic or emerging large enterprises in that country. They offer, inter alia, a typology of the main Indian industrial combines, structured around three "families" (public companies, the manufacturing and consumer durables industries, and enterprises in the knowledge and service sector). They go on to depict an Indian business landscape that will have undergone profound change by 2025, by comparison with the early years of the 21st century, within which a number of large combines will most certainly have acquired front-rank international stature.

Revue

Économie, emploi

India 2025: the Economic Prospects. The "Great Transformation" of the Indian Economy

On 12 October 2007, the "India 2025" Conference was held in Paris. It was organized by the Institut des hautes études de défense nationale and the Asia 21 group (Futuribles International). Among the questions tackled were geopolitical considerations, some of which have already been the subject of articles in Futuribles (February and March 2008), and socio-economic aspects, which are covered more specifically in this issue.
Jean-Joseph Boillot, the chief scientific adviser to the conference, gave a paper on the economic development of India to 2025, presenting the various projections and possible future scenarios for India as an economic power. This article reproduces the main elements of that contribution, demonstrating that the country is on the eve of its "Great Transformation".
Boillot begins by analysing the development of India's GDP up to the year 2025, together with the component parts of that development (labour, capital, productivity), basing himself on a comparison of the main recent predictions. These suggest an economic growth figure of 4.5%-8.5% per annum between now and 2020/2025. He goes on to unpack these results, stressing a number of perspectival effects and micro/macro confusions, before examining the "Great Transformation" in detail. In this way, he shows that even if only part of the country - the "modern India" that is part of the globalized economy - participates in the national take-off, this could have a significant impact on the global economy.

Revue

Économie, emploi

India and Asia in the Years to 2025. Will India Join the "Flying Wild Geese"

On 12 October 2007 the "India 2025" Conference was held in Paris. It was organized by the Institut des hautes études de défense nationale and the Asia 21 group (Futuribles International). Among the questions tackled were geopolitical considerations, some of which have already been the subject of articles in Futuribles (February and March 2008), and socio-economic aspects, which are covered more specifically in this issue.
Jean-Raphaël Chaponnière, who spoke on Indian economic power and Asia in 2025 at the conference, presents here the fruits of his thinking on this subject. After outlining the main features of the Indian economy and demonstrating its openness, particularly to the region (based on a comparison with the Chinese giant and a number of newly industrialized Asian countries), he examines how India - and, more generally, Asia - might develop economically between now and 2025. Overall, India seems likely to remain economically sound, though not to outstrip China. Its trading relations will probably stay focussed more on Asia than on the wider world and disparities of wealth can be expected to persist internally.

Forum

Société, modes de vie

Impediments to Indian Progress

On 12 October 2007, the "India 2025" Conference was held in Paris. It was organized by the Institute of Higher National Defence Studies (IHEDN, Paris) and the "Asia 21" group (Futuribles International). Among the questions tackled were geopolitical developments in India, some aspects of which were covered in the February 2008 issue by Frédéric Grare and Isabelle Saint-Mézard. Alain Lamballe, who also spoke at the conference, gave an account of the factors that were likely to impede the rise of India between now and 2025 and he presents his analysis for us here.
Lamballe takes a highly pessimistic view of the future of South-Eastern Asia. He stresses India's weaknesses - namely the reservations of the two majority religions about progress, the potential ethnic and religious rivalries, the risks of insurrection and terrorism, the lack of energy resources and the regional geopolitical dangers etc. There is nothing to indicate that the "gloomy" scenarios that can be derived from these weaknesses will actually materialize over the next 20 years, but it is important, nonetheless, to be aware of them, in order to develop a better grasp of the elements that might lead to such an outcome and to observe how they develop over time.

Revue

Géopolitique

India, China and Japan: The Future of Asian Power

On 12 October 2007, a conference was held in Paris on the theme "India 2025: Possible Scenarios, and Issues for France and Europe". It was organized by the Institut des hautes études de défense nationale and the "Asia 21" group (Futuribles International). Among the ranges of questions considered were the geopolitical changes in India, which include the development of relations between that country and its two great Asian neighbours, China and Japan. Isabelle Saint-Mézard, who covered this issue in the "India 2025" conference, broadly restates here her analysis of the triangular relationship between India, China and Japan and of the prospective development of that relationship over the next 15-20 years.
After outlining the factors that make for increasing interdependence between these three countries (among them, openness to international trade, energy supply and security issues), she analyses the rapprochement between China and India that has been developing for some years and its potentially lasting character. She then studies relations between India and Japan, which are essentially economic and less developed than with China, but likely to strengthen, particularly at the political and geopolitical levels, most notably to counter their neighbour China, if that country were to assume too great an influence in Asia. As Isabelle Saint-Mézard stresses in conclusion, the relations between these three Asian giants will doubtless increase in complexity, including both competitive and cooperative aspects. Those relations will depend on each country's desire to maintain the regional status quo, the positioning of China being particularly significant in this regard.

Revue

Géopolitique

India, China and Japan: The Future of Asian Power

On 12 October 2007, a conference was held in Paris on the theme "India 2025: Possible Scenarios, and Issues for France and Europe". It was organized by the Institut des hautes études de défense nationale and the "Asia 21" group (Futuribles International). Among the ranges of questions considered were the geopolitical changes in India, which include the development of relations between that country and its two great Asian neighbours, China and Japan. Isabelle Saint-Mézard, who covered this issue in the "India 2025" conference, broadly restates here her analysis of the triangular relationship between India, China and Japan and of the prospective development of that relationship over the next 15-20 years.
After outlining the factors that make for increasing interdependence between these three countries (among them, openness to international trade, energy supply and security issues), she analyses the rapprochement between China and India that has been developing for some years and its potentially lasting character. She then studies relations between India and Japan, which are essentially economic and less developed than with China, but likely to strengthen, particularly at the political and geopolitical levels, most notably to counter their neighbour China, if that country were to assume too great an influence in Asia. As Isabelle Saint-Mézard stresses in conclusion, the relations between these three Asian giants will doubtless increase in complexity, including both competitive and cooperative aspects. Those relations will depend on each country's desire to maintain the regional status quo, the positioning of China being particularly significant in this regard.

Chapitre de rapport annuel vigie

Économie, emploi - Géopolitique

Chapitre 4 du rapport Vigie 2007 : La Chine et l’Inde : le sprint des géants

En Chine et en Inde, la combinaison d’une croissance économique soutenue, de capacités militaires en expansion et de populations nombreuses constitueront le socle d’une croissance attendue en forte accélération, tant sur le plan économique que sur le plan politique. La Chine et l’Inde ont amorcé « un sprint soudain dans la course à la puissance » et ont à ce jour à peine commencé leur bouleversement de l’ordre international. Chindia, la Chine et l’Inde agrégées du fait ...

(215 more words)

Note de veille

Géopolitique

Chindia (1) : le rapprochement des géants asiatiques

Dans un article intitulé " Different Paths of Asian Giants ", publié par le Straits Times de Singapour, trois universitaires, Ramkishen S. Rajan (George Mason University), David A. Kelly (National University of Singapore) et Gillian H. L. Goh (National University of Singapore) reviennent sur les voies de la croissance telles qu'elles ont été empruntées par l'Inde et la Chine. Les chemins ont été différents mais se rejoignent aujourd'hui et les deux pays se mettent à l'école l'un ...

(43 more words)

Analyse prospective

Économie, emploi

La Chine et l’Inde : le lièvre et la tortue ?

Il est traditionnel d'opposer la vitesse de la croissance de la Chine à un développement économique de l'Inde plus lent. L' analyse développée récemment par deux chercheurs de la Brookings Institution montre que la réalité est plus complexe. Ainsi, la croissance indienne est relativement forte et a tendance à s' accélérer. En termes de facteur de croissance, la croissance chinoise est intensive en capital tandis que la productivité totale des facteurs joue un rôle relativement plus important en ...

(31 more words)

Note de veille

Économie, emploi

Une illustration de « Chindia « 

Leader mondial dans le secteur de l'outsourcing lié aux technologies de l'information, l'Inde a longtemps été réticente pour conclure d'éventuels partenariats avec la Chine, par crainte de fournir des atouts à un rival économique. L'accord tripartite qui a été signé en novembre 2006 à Bombay, entre Tata Consultancy Services, un consortium d'entreprises chinoises et Microsoft, témoigne que le pas a été franchi, donnant corps au concept de " Chindia ".

Bibliography

Population - Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

India’s Water Future to 2025-2050 : Business as Usual Scenario and Deviations

L'International Water Management Institute (Institut international de gestion des ressources en eau) est un organisme scientifique à but non lucratif dont la mission est d'« améliorer la gestion des ressources en eau et en terres pour assurer l'alimentation et les moyens de subsistance et protéger la nature ». L'IWMI travaille en partenariat avec des pays en développement, des instituts internationaux et nationaux de recherche, des universités et d'autres organisations en vue de mettre au point des outils ...

(512 more words)

Bibliography

Géopolitique - Territoires, réseaux

The Elephant and the Dragon. The Rise of India and China and What It Means for All of Us

« Cet ouvrage s’efforce d’aider les lecteurs à comprendre comment notre monde est transformé par l’essor de l’Inde et de la Chine — des pays dont l’impact potentiel sur les prochaines décennies est à la fois redouté et sous-estimé. » L’auteur, Robyn Meredith, est une journaliste américaine, correspondante de Forbes, spécialiste de l’Inde (l’éléphant) et de la Chine (le dragon). La croissance des deux géants asiatiques a d’ores et déjà permis à des millions ...

(340 more words)

Bibliography

Économie, emploi

The « Bird of Gold » : the Rise of India’s Consumer Market

Ce rapport est publié par la division Études économiques de la firme-conseil McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). Il vise à évaluer les potentialités à long terme du marché indien en adoptant une démarche qui conduise à comprendre comment les tendances profondes liées à la croissance économique (dynamiques démographiques, urbanisation, amélioration du niveau d'éducation...) vont accroître le niveau des revenus, et comment cette augmentation du pouvoir d'achat va influer à son tour sur la consommation des ménages. Sur la période ...

(546 more words)

Bibliography

Économie, emploi

OECD Economic Surveys. India

Dans sa première étude économique sur l'Inde, l'OCDE note que les réformes axées sur le marché, mises en œuvre depuis les années 1980, ont contribué à réduire la pauvreté et que les revenus moyens devraient doubler dans la prochaine décennie. Depuis le milieu des années 1980, en effet, l'Inde a connu une profonde réorientation de sa gestion économique. Des réformes successives ont progressivement réorienté l'économie indienne vers un système de marché. L'intervention et le contrôle ...

(311 more words)

Bibliography

Entreprises, travail - Recherche, sciences, techniques

The Atlas of Ideas : How Asian Innovation Can Benefit Us All

« Nous pensions savoir d'où viendraient les nouvelles idées : des universités, des parcs technologiques et des centres de recherche des entreprises des pays riches. À revoir. L'essor de la Chine et de l'Inde implique que la prééminence américaine et européenne en matière d'innovation scientifique ne peut plus être tenue pour acquise. Non plus que ne peuvent être tenus pour assurés les " emplois de la connaissance " qui en dépendaient. » Telle est la mise en garde lancée par une ...

(498 more words)

Bibliography

Recherche, sciences, techniques

IT and the East. How China and India are Altering the Future of Technology and Innovation ?

James M. Popkin et Partha Iyengar sont deux spécialistes des technologies de l'information (TI) qui occupent des postes de direction au sein de Gartner Inc., la firme de consultance américaine spécialisée dans le conseil aux entreprises de haute technologie. Point de départ de cet ouvrage, le constat selon lequel dans le domaine technologique, le centre de gravité du monde a basculé à l'est. Certes, les pays occidentaux sont déjà accoutumés au rôle de la Chine et de l ...

(292 more words)

Bibliography

Économie, emploi - Géopolitique

Capitalism and Democracy in 2040 : Forecasts and Speculations

En 2000, l'économie mondiale est dominée par six groupes de pays : les États-Unis, les 15 pays de l'Union européenne (UE), l'Inde, la Chine, le Japon et les six pays d'Asie du Sud-Est (Singapour, la Malaisie, l'Indonésie, la Thaïlande, la Corée du Sud et Taiwan). En termes démographiques, ces six groupes de pays représentent 58 % de la population mondiale ; en termes de PIB (produit intérieur brut), ils représentent 73 % de la production mondiale. Sur la base ...

(535 more words)

Bibliography

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

Politiques agricoles des pays non membres de l’OCDE

Ce rapport de l'OCDE étudie les politiques agricoles de huit pays représentant un tiers de la production agricole mondiale : l'Afrique du Sud, le Brésil, la Chine, l'Inde, la Bulgarie, la Roumanie, la Russie et l'Ukraine. Il ressort de cette étude que, dans la plupart de ces pays, la part des recettes agricoles brutes issues des subventions du soutien public est inférieure a 15 %, alors qu'elle est en moyenne de 30 % dans les pays membres de ...

(516 more words)

Bibliography

Ressources naturelles, énergie, environnement

World Energy Outlook 2007

L'AIE a élaboré deux scénarios, un scénario de référence (sans changement de politique) et un scénario alternatif (plus économe en énergie) à l'horizon 2030. Dans le scénario de référence, les besoins énergétiques de la planète devraient dépasser leur niveau de 2005 de 55 % à l'horizon 2030, augmentant à un rythme de 1,8 % par an. La demande atteindrait alors 17,7 milliards de tonnes d'équivalent pétrole (tep), contre 11,4 milliards de tep en 2005. La ...

(423 more words)

CR table ronde

Population

Les futurs possibles de l’Inde

L’Inde, comme la Chine, fascine. Les performances économiques des deux pays, notamment, n’en finissent pas de susciter l’intérêt de nombre de penseurs, hommes politiques et observateurs étrangers ; certains parmi ceux-ci cherchant en retour à identifier les raisons de ces succès, ainsi que leurs conséquences vraisemblables à plus ou moins long terme. Ce travail d’observation et de réflexion prospective, déjà fondamental en soi, apparaît également comme un excellent moyen d’observation et de mise en lumière de ...

(21 more words)

Revue

Économie, emploi - Population

The Possible Futures for the Indian Economy

India, like China, has increasingly fascinated Western economists and analysts. The country that calls itself "the world's largest democracy" looks to be one of the most promising economic powers of the 21st century.
Jean-Joseph Boillot, an expert on India, examines here the rather too common tendency to idealize its economic prospects. He makes use of scenarios to show the possible trends for this vast nation in the coming years and he emphasizes the many uncertainties facing the country, disagreeing with the idea that India will be a superpower by 2050. For both demographic and economic reasons, there is no guarantee that India will soon achieve a comparable growth to its Chinese neighbour. With the aid of forecasts and scenarios, Jean-Joseph Boillot highlights the many factors that could affect Indian growth prospects. In particular, he cites the results of a study produced by the Davos forum which concluded that India's economic development remains unclear and will depend above all on the political strategies it adopts.

Analyse prospective

Économie, emploi

Inde : la fracture sociale et géographique s’accentue

Depuis le début des années 1990, à travers des réformes qui ont instauré une libéralisation mesurée, l'Inde a peu à peu réussi à s'installer dans le peloton de tête des pays affichant les taux de croissance les plus élevés au monde. Cette croissance a incontestablement permis l'essor d'une classe moyenne et contribué à faire reculer la pauvreté " en chiffres relatifs ". L'Inde, constituerait-elle " le laboratoire de la mondialisation heureuse " (Jackie Assayag) ? Les succès " high tech " de ...

(70 more words)